• NocturnalMorning@lemmy.world
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    28 days ago

    Body: I’m tired, let’s go to bed

    Brain: Nah, I think I’ll stay up super late instead and be tired tomorrow for no reason.

    • ChocoboRocket@lemmy.world
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      28 days ago

      You forgot my favorite of sleep-hating-brain internal dialogue!

      "Why would you need to sleep until your alarm goes off when I can wake you early and you can be anxious about not sleeping! Or all the stuff you feel you should now start but are too tired to do even though you know I won’t let you sleep!

      Wouldn’t want to sleep through that! Why do you think I kept you up so late??"

    • BambiDiego@lemmy.world
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      28 days ago

      There’s also:

      Brain: Okay, time to do things!

      Body: Ehh… Later, let’s just lay here and have anxiety about not doing the things

      • Murdoc@sh.itjust.works
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        28 days ago

        "In a world of disorder I lie awake

        Knowing there’s nothing I can do

        In a world of disorder I lie awake

        Knowing there’s something I can do"

        Disorder - Chiasm

        There’s different ways to interpret these, but given the topic here I’ve found another one.

    • TimLovesTech (AuDHD)(he/him)@badatbeing.social
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      28 days ago

      This every night. And then I also get up early, or I don’t have enough time to build up dopamine to make my day a little easier (especially pre-meds and ultimately the end of the day when meds are done for the day).

      • ThirdWorldOrder@lemm.ee
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        28 days ago

        I’m in my 40s now and still get to bed after midnight and wake up around 5. This shit has been going on for over a decade and I’m wondering when my body will actually sleep.

    • ricecake@sh.itjust.works
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      28 days ago

      I mean, if you don’t how will you end up with your body feeling tired tomorrow? It’d ruin the whole routine!

  • broken_chatbot@lemmy.world
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    28 days ago

    Even ADHD-oriented media is often being dishonest with people who suspect themselves to have this condition, being toxicly positive and showing ADHD as a “superpower” as if you can hyperfocus your way to success. It is neither a gift nor even an equal exchange between advantages and drawbacks like “you’ll be always late but also always creative!” It’s a crippling thing that may ruin career or end a relationship. There is nothing good with ADHD.

    • The Picard Maneuver@lemmy.worldOP
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      28 days ago

      Absolutely. People want there to be a fair trade-off, but life just doesn’t work that way. I’ve seen similar romanticization of autism too, especially with the “savants”.

      • Naz@sh.itjust.works
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        28 days ago

        Sorry. Most of that shit has been my fault, and people like me.

        In recent times, there’s been a push to reclassify certain disabilities from … disabilities, into “neurodivergence.” in an attempt to destigmatize certain disorders, and cast them in a new light as part of human evolution.

        The idea that life is a min-maxing situation comes from the “just world fallacy”, the fallacious belief that all good and evils “must balance out”. Someone born with some profound disability might have no overarching heartwarming lesson for society to learn, and life might just be about abject cruelty.

        I don’t know if the community appreciates or hates that change, but, I’ve seen autism go from being called something quite hateful (/r) in the 1990s, to becoming a spectrum, to people working with autistic people and just calling them “different”.

        The romanticization might come from movies like Rain Man, and the few high profile savant cases (on ASD), e.g: I recall speculation that Bill Gates and Elon Musk both had Asperger’s Syndrome.

        What’s your take on this?

        • The Picard Maneuver@lemmy.worldOP
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          28 days ago

          I think it’s definitely had the positive effects that you mention. People are far less cruel, more understanding, and also WAY more willing to go seek help with these types of problems than they used to be.

          The negative effect is that anytime something becomes romanticized, it’s human nature for people to adopt it as an identity, which introduces a lot of noise to the conversation, and we lose some of our objectivity toward it, as now there’s an emotional attachment to the label itself. For example:

          • Back in the day (early 2010s?) of tumblr, when people first started collecting mental health labels like personal trading cards.
          • Or now, with the plethora of pseudoscientific misinformation about mental health on tiktok: random people are just making up terms or symptoms and pitching them in a nearly universally relatable way like horoscopes.
          • If you offer people a label that makes them feel part of a group, supported, and potentially explain why a bunch of things in their life are hard, it’s in our nature to gravitate toward that.

          All that being said, I still think it’s a net-positive effect. This is just what happens anytime something clinical enters the mainstream conversation.

          • Azuth@lemmy.today
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            26 days ago

            it’s human nature for people to adopt it as an identity, which introduces a lot of noise to the conversation, and we lose some of our objectivity toward it, as now there’s an emotional attachment to the label itself.

            I’ve noticed this in LGBQT culture as well. I’m a gay older Millenial and I’ve noticed that zoomers make their sexuality a much bigger part of their identities than qeer folks my age and older do as it becomes more accepted. For me, I don’t want to be “special”. I want absolute equality- I wish being with my boyfriend was seen as normal and ordinary.

        • Shou@lemmy.world
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          27 days ago

          I hate it. Sure. Being called a retard isn’t great, but having people claim ASDs are just a different way of thinking is downplaying problems. Oh how quirky we are!

          If I wasn’t retarded, I would have been able to study properly instead of relying on hyperfocus and high ascociative thinking. I would have graduated. If I wasn’t retarded, I would have been able to do things consistently and perseveer. Instead, I lose and gain weight over and over. I’m going to develop diabetes at this rate. Going to a 24/7 open gym is the only chance I got at staving off the problems caused by depression and my dopamine hunger induced eating disorder. If I wasn’t retarded, people would have appreciated me more. Instead, I am too much. Say too much. Exist too much. Even when I predict something, or suggest something that people think was good, they believe someone else in the group thought of it.

          Furthermore, downplaying the issues could have people mistake just how capable people with autism/ADHD are. People shouldn’t think that starting a family with someone autistic is just “going to be a little different.” People seriously ought to reconsider marrying someone lacking theory of mind skills. And autists should seriously reconsider whether or not they are suitable parents. Baby cries? Can’t have a meltdown. Baby needs consistent care? Better not have exec. dys. inhibiting your jobsecurity and energy management. Need to be able to get on the level of the child, make the child feel heard and understood? Sucks for the kid if the parent lacks that ability too. Both my parents are autistic/AD(H)D, and were downright neglectful and one abusive. They have no real friends. They struggle with emotional regulation and communication. I’ve been working my ass off to become better than them.

          I don’t care what people call having multiple mental disabilities. What’s important is helping children on the spectrum. Early detection could have spared me further brain damage and subsequent stacking of developmental problems.

          • rottingleaf@lemmy.zip
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            26 days ago

            Retarded is a synonym of mentally underdeveloped. If that’s not the case, then it’s just used incorrectly.

            Usually because of social disdain for your behavior, and intended to degrade you into a lesser person than them.

            Usually starts when your position on something irritates people who don’t have any arguments other than your condition.

            You’ve literally described how people around you make mistakes and put their weight on you. You are trying to reach them, but they are not trying to reach you. That’s just wrong kind of people. I have friends and even neighbors not like this. Don’t try to be good enough for some filth.

            I don’t care what people call having multiple mental disabilities. What’s important is helping children on the spectrum. Early detection could have spared me further brain damage and subsequent stacking of developmental problems.

            I care about both, but it’s correct at least that people with such conditions should know about them as early as possible, to help with the challenges presented.

            People shouldn’t think that starting a family with someone autistic is just “going to be a little different.”

            Where I live people overthink that a lot. Somebody who had a few abusive relationships still thinks that one with an autistic person is worse because they are disabled or because they are crazy or some other ignorant caveman shit.

            But you are right that for an autistic person a relationship with someone not conscious of all this is an idea that will fail without doubt. Because such people don’t even know that one can think about relationships, it all works instinctively for them. They react to any diversion from the usual path the same way a Windows user reacts to a BSOD. They don’t even see that nothing particularly bad has happened, are afraid to think and just run away.

            • Shou@lemmy.world
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              25 days ago

              Thank you for reading. I agree with you.

              Unfortunately. AD(H)D does impact brain development. People have brains that are and wothout care remain underdeveloped in a few regions, as well as the connections between these regions. So the use of retard is correct.

              I can’t blame people for not wasting energy on a child that needs a lot more structure, support and training.

              As for relationships. They do ask things that people on the spectrum struggle with. From being able to put oneself in the other’s shoes, to being aware of how they feel themselves about a situation. Struggling with emotional regulation can also cause problems, while not being aware that what they said or did wasn’t okay.

              Take my dad for example. He destroyed family ties between my mother and his side of the family. He compartimenalized me as part of “mom’s” side. Reducing what little family connection I had. All because of hypersensitivity and not wanting to be around “too many people” once a year for christmas. So to this day he has two christmas parties. With his family, and us. Even though everyone on “his side” is on the spectrum and would have understood if he communicated about getting overstimulated. No one bothered to ask why, or what my sister and I thought of it. As after all, they struggle with theory of mind.

              With such carelessness or lack of awareness, I cannot blame someone for not thinking and just running away. If someone is seemingly shortsighted, unreliable or uncaring, why stay with them? Or starting a relationship with them with no certainty things will improve? It’s wrong to believe you can change or fix someone, it is foolish to try when you don’t.

              • rottingleaf@lemmy.zip
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                25 days ago

                I can’t blame people for not wasting energy on a child that needs a lot more structure, support and training.

                Nah. Just different choices in all of these. I have ADHD. Most of the problems are not about trying to achieve the same things as others do, but trying to achieve them the same way others do. After solving that there are still downsides, but these are not qualitative.

                It takes very little to notice which things don’t work and don’t try them again. A parent who doesn’t care about this is a bad parent, and an educator who ignores this is simply malicious. At least in my experience people would very easily change their approaches.

                Including very traditional-minded people and those denying the condition itself (“you don’t have a disorder, you just need to do things your own way” is ignorant, but really better than using others’ conditions to attack them, and I’ve heard this really often ; definitely better than “oh, it’s so sad, I really hope everything will be good with you, I really like your imagination and hope you’ll give it more attention, but it seems you won’t change, we are too different, don’t write me anymore”, said in 20x the amount of words, in relationships).

                Those who wouldn’t were either insulted by some perceived lack of respect and tried to prove that I’m stupid, needless to say that lack of respect became genuine then (like a few school teachers and university professors, but not all of them ; or peers of the “dumb and uninventive, but proud of being capable of stealing something” kind), or ignorant idiots of the Soviet generation afraid of anything connected to mental health (like my dad, what’s even dumber I’m confident he was autistic too).

                With such carelessness or lack of awareness, I cannot blame someone for not thinking and just running away. If someone is seemingly shortsighted, unreliable or uncaring, why stay with them? Or starting a relationship with them with no certainty things will improve? It’s wrong to believe you can change or fix someone, it is foolish to try when you don’t.

                Humans have invented words to discuss all those things. If it’s about spending possibly the rest of your life alongside someone, being reluctant to talk is just strange. Yes, if the other person thinks they know better and this shouldn’t be discussed in detail, then no chance.

                Unless that other person is too autistic, ha-ha. Then that particular kind of problems one can just write off.

        • rottingleaf@lemmy.zip
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          26 days ago

          This is just a misunderstanding of statistics. Something being true for the average doesn’t mean it’s true for separate points.

          But in average that’s a bit like calling homosexualism a disability.

          I like the border between disability and just neurodivergence to be drawn where it needs to be cured with medicine or you turn into a vegetable or can’t survive. Like with schizophrenia, or maybe BPD. With autism and ADHD most of the problems are from trying to follow procedures for people who are different and imitate them, and most of the solutions are about teaching people with these conditions to drop those imitations and know themselves. I mean, medicine helps, but the problems it solves are too mostly about network effect.

        • broken_chatbot@lemmy.world
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          27 days ago

          I understand what you mean! What I (and probably most of us) want is the balance between “treat me like a normal person” (as in, with the same dignity and less condescension) and “don’t set expectations too high”. I believe portraying persons on the spectre as savant geniuses as in “Rain Man” or ADHD as a “superpower” skews the balance to one side and we just need some disclaimers to even it out.

        • luciferofastora@lemmy.zip
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          26 days ago

          As a low support / “high functioning” (which feels like a toxic phrase for “good at masking and compensating”) autist, it’s easy for me say “I’m just different” and blame my disadvantages on a society that fails to accomodate for that divergence. I often stay away from spaces where I know I won’t be comfortable, I miss out on events I fear may overwhelm me, I retreat when I don’t feel like I can handle navigating the minefield of social interaction. I’m excluding myself from things, because I know (or fear) those things won’t cater to my differences, but I’m not universally unable to participate, so it feels less like a disability to me (more on that later).

          That most certainly doesn’t hold for people whose “functioning” is more severely impaired. If you respond to unexpected changes with anxiety attacks because you can’t adjust quickly, that certainly presents a disability in the literal sense and a challenge in dealing with everyday occurrences.

          I feel like the shift away from calling it a disability is partially due to the stigma of treating people with disabilities as lesser, partially because it’s not always a visible physical disability and I’ve seen people argue that it’s not a real disability. Both of those are bad, but instead of engaging them, It’s sometimes easier to sidestep. Instead of arguing whether I’m disabled or not, I’ll call it a neurodivergence, because my brain being different is something that’s beyond argument.

          There is also the opposite to disdain or dismissal: Pity or praise. Instead of treating me as defective or overdramatic, some people have responded with some form of “oh you poor thing, that must be hard” or “you’re so strong, making your way through life despite those challenges”.
          The first one may be half-right, but it just feels like something you’d say when you don’t know what’s appropriate and are trying to play it safe with the empathy angle.

          The second feels hollow, because I don’t feel stronger. I struggle far more than I could even express, because expressing thoughts in itself is a struggle. I spent forever writing this comment. To consider myself stronger than others would require me to somehow quantify my difficulties and weigh them up against theirs. I don’t think that’s productive. I think it will lead to some form of “suffering olympics”, which is a mindset I’d like to avoid.
          And really, what else would I do? Sit in a corner and cry about the injustice of the universe? Might as well curse the sun for being hot, it doesn’t change anything. Better to look for shade instead of dwelling on the problem.

          I don’t want people to treat me like I’m subhuman, nor like I’m superhuman. I don’t want people to invalidate my difficulties, nor make a point of dwelling on them. I want people to acknowledge that this is how I work, to understand if I’m doing something “wrong” or have difficulties, possibly help me if it’s reasonable.
          I don’t need a lot of accommodation, just some patience, understanding when I express myself poorly or do things a certain way that suits me more and maybe someone to handle difficult communication on my behalf. So I wouldn’t describe myself as disabled, whether or not that would be accurate, because of the social baggage that word carries. I’d rather leave the relevant help resources for those that need it more.

          That’s not to discount anyone else’s self-description. If you feel like “disability” fits your condition, I’m not going to invalidate that. You know your experience better than anyone else. In fact, I can see an argument that my self-exclusion as response to my difficulties presents some degree of disability to participate.

          I’m still fighting my own preconceptions on that, and it probably is part of the reason I don’t feel like disabled is an accurate description for msyelf. I’ve grown up with a certain set of convictions and prejudice that I’ve deeply internalised. I’ve mostly managed to expunge them when it comes to others, occasionally still catching myself in some judgmental train of thought and then consciously derailing it, but I have difficulties accurately and productively reflecting on my own self-perception. In a way, it’s both the least outwardly toxic, yet most self-destructive form of hypocrisy, and I don’t know how to deal with it.


          As for the romanticisation, I feel like that might be the result of efforts to fight the stigma having overshot their goal due to survivorship bias. Yes, people with ASD may have unique talents too. Yes, we’re not all entirely disadvantaged. Yes, ASD doesn’t automatically make us strictly less capable.

          But most of us aren’t some insane genius. You just wouldn’t make a big deal out of the average, so the media report on the extraordinary instead. And if someone’s only contact with the topic is through media that show the savants, it’s easy to forget that what they see isn’t representative.

      • gamermanh@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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        28 days ago

        Nah, super focus is totally a thing, just not everyone does it.

        My wife can’t sit in a computer chair for 8 hours straight playing a game/editing a video/writing something/reading Wikipedia really hard, but I can.

        And no, I can’t control it so it’s not a superpower, it’s random enforced focus and it’s only sometimes a helpful thing. Usually the work I do when doing it gets worse much faster and it does major damage to your body to sit in 1 position for that long not peeing.

        • GTG3000@programming.dev
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          28 days ago

          No, no, I know what hyperfocus is, it’s the reason I no longer touch creative writing with a ten foot pole after getting bombarded with “but you wrote this one in an hour and it is awesome! just write another one!” :D

          I meant that I am wondering if normal people just get the same productivity but without it being flipped on or off randomly, provided they don’t get distracted by something. You know, kinda like learning that it’s not just a tv thing that people can say “okay, let’s do this” and actually sit down and do “this” and not have to beat their brain into submission first.

          • GlendatheGayWitch@lemmy.world
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            28 days ago

            They call it the Flow state, there are books and I’m sure seminars about getting into the flow state to help you focus and get more done.

        • brognak@lemm.ee
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          26 days ago

          I can’t control it so it’s not a superpower, it’s random enforced focus

          I call it catching the wave. You cant predict the wave and you have no idea if it will ever even happen. Sometimes just have to sit and wait for the motivation to complete tasks to hit, then ride it as long as I can until it tapers off again.

    • rottingleaf@lemmy.zip
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      26 days ago

      or end a relationship

      Rather that relationship doesn’t even start, not because you insult someone (that happens, but you’re forgiven), not because you are not likeable (I thought I’m that for a long time, and lots of moments I am), but because you just don’t (despite being hit on by people amazingly beautiful and interesting and intelligent and sending electric shocks your way by simply texting you).

      Though I guess someone giving you chances for over a year qualifies as a relationship which ends at some point. Just dysfunctional.

      There is nothing good with ADHD.

      It gives incentives to be a kinder person. You feel emotions connected to hurt\comfort more acutely than those connected to prestige, power, dominance. You dream far and swift. You don’t care about lying (EDIT: I meant that you don’t lie, not the opposite).

      Any time I want to say what you said and recount all the suffering, I notice that I like it more than the alternative.

      Also I still think it can be an equal exchange in a world more friendly to ADHD people.

      EDIT: And it can be used against fear.

  • Fushuan [he/him]@lemm.ee
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    28 days ago

    Does it help if someone forces you to do the thing or is is better to give time and space until you decide to do it? Asking for a friend.

    • glimse@lemmy.world
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      28 days ago

      The #1 thing that helps me is having a partner for whatever the thing is. If someone has the same goal as me, I will put 150% into getting it done.

      But if the thing only benefits me? Well, then I’ll just go ahead and shoot myself right in the foot

      • jol@discuss.tchncs.de
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        28 days ago

        Body doubling.

        I can clean the whole kitchen while also preparing dinner and dessert if my SO is in the kitchen, even if they’re not helping. But alone? Forget it. I’ll be lucky to remember the water kettle was on.

        • m0darn@lemmy.ca
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          28 days ago

          I’m like this for most things except for cleaning the kitchen. It’s essential to know she’s counting on me, but if she’s actually there I can’t do anything. It could have something to do with the layout of our kitchen (she has to stand behind me if I’m washing dishes).

          If she was working on something at the table I could probably ignore her and focus on cleaning, but if she’s trying to clean too, I can’t.

      • billwashere@lemmy.world
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        28 days ago

        Boy am I glad I’m not the only one. This describes me exactly. Having a partner nag me to get something done is like having a literal little devil on my shoulder and is often the motivation I need. Now with me and my own projects that she has no vested interest in, those sit and languish for days, weeks, months, years….

        • glimse@lemmy.world
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          28 days ago

          (this is not a flex AT ALL) I am selfless to a fault. I care so little about my needs in comparison to others’ and I hate it

          • Murdoc@sh.itjust.works
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            28 days ago

            I just finished a book called How to keep house while drowning by KC Davis. It’s written for people with ADHD, autism, ptsd, handicapped, etc. anyone with challenges to getting things done, and this is one of the big themes in it, basically how to be kind to yourself. But there are lots of angles and tips and topics in there. Even witten in short, easy to read chapters. Should check it out.

    • ricecake@sh.itjust.works
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      28 days ago

      Depends on the thing.
      Super high level, ADHD is an issue with the reward system of the brain failing to deliver reward when it’s supposed to. Your brain is supposed to try to find a new task when it’s not getting it’s reward anymore; it’s how that frontal cortex problem solving engine gets driven around by all the parts that handle motivation, wants and desires.
      Sometimes no reward is being given, so you keep slipping off to a different task, and sometimes too much reward is being given and so you stay on a task way too long.
      And, to be clear: these are not huge rewards we’re talking about like a wave of pleasure or noticable feeling, just the baseline steering signals.

      Sometimes the task you need to do provides no “normal” reward but neither does what you’re doing right now, so your problem solver sees no reason to switch. Sometimes a nudge can help because fulfilling a request or suggestion can come with some reward, or at least you’re just swapping out neutral tasks with some minor effort.

      Sometimes the task is unpleasant to some minor degree, so not only is the reward not there, it’s also a punishment. Or the thing you’re currently doing is providing some degree of reward.
      In either case, switching means actively going against everything your problem solver uses to decide what to do. Needless to say, that’s really hard, and being nudged often feels more like being nagged, or like they’re upset with you, because your problem solver (also known as your conscious self) knows this is all going on, but knowing how the engine is working doesn’t make it work differently.
      So you’ve been sitting there trying to push a granite block up a hill for an hour, and then someone comes up and starts pushing on your back. They haven’t removed the part that made it hard, but they added something uncomfortable to your current situation.

      Before I got on medication following my diagnosis, me and my partner handled it by just being really cognizant of what our mental states are, and communicating clearly. “You asked me to remind you”, “I need to do it, but I’m stuck”, and effectively asking for permission before annoying someone to the point where the current blocker is less desirable than doing the thing. Requires a lot of trust and good communication though.

      It’s difficult to describe subjective feelings, but what can sometimes look like “sitting on the couch watching short YouTube videos about sheep dogs instead of brushing your teeth and going to bed” is actually: sitting on the couch bored out of your mind and desperately wanting to go to bed, but the sheepdogs are providing short bursts of novelty and cute. Removing your lap blanket provides no joy and makes you cold. Standing up provides no joy and makes you less comfortable. Walking to the bathroom provides no joy and now you’re in the dark bathroom. Brushing your teeth provides no joy, tastes bad, and is intensely boring. Walking to the bedroom provides no joy. Getting into bed and snuggling up provides joy.
      Summed up: sheep dogs provide continuous minor joy, and only costs the physical misery of staying awake, the confused guilt of paralysis, and the promise of future misery. Going to bed is a promise of some joy, but it comes with a bunch of steps that are at best neutral and often entail anti-joy. It just doesn’t add up. Other people get a tiny hit of joy from each substep, which is why they can say “I’m done looking at sheepdogs, I’m going to bed” and then just magically do it.

      “Before you go to bed, you need to slowly press your bare foot into this fresh dog poop, toes spread of course” isn’t often made better by someone saying “it’s not that bad, come on, you can do it, I believe in you, then you can get some rest for once”.

      • GOTFrog@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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        28 days ago

        That youtube short part really hurts, I know thats whats going on, but getting the move on is so impossible. I also can’t get my brain to understand that sleeping is not wasting time, even while I’m wasting time watching nothings on youtube.

        • ricecake@sh.itjust.works
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          28 days ago

          Sometimes I picture my prefrontal cortex as a well meaning bureaucrat who’s just like "oh, trust me, I know the rules are terrible and there’s an active problem. Nothing I can do about it though, I just work here. Second that order comes in though, I’m on it boss, you better believe. You’re gonna want to talk to my manager. Yeah, he doesn’t take calls. It sucks, could maybe get something fixed around here. "

          • davidagain@lemmy.world
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            27 days ago

            Can you expand on this please? I don’t know what my prefrontal cortex’s role is and don’t get what this means. If it’s a way of getting past the task resistance, that would be very helpful.

            • ricecake@sh.itjust.works
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              27 days ago

              Sure! Unfortunately, it was purely a joke and has no helpful qualities that I can think of.

              Your prefrontal cortex is the very front edge of your brain, and it’s (very generally because brains are complicated) responsible for problem solving, decision making and stuff like that.
              It’s the part of your brain that makes the call to actually remove the blanket.
              These are called “executive functions”.

              It’s also very associated with a lot of parts of personality expression, so while it’s not where “you” are, damage to it has a more pronounced impact than other parts of your brain, so sometimes people treat it like it’s “you”.

              It picks which tasks to do based on that reward system I mentioned in my original comment. It doesn’t directly control which task it’s pointed at trying to solve, so it can come up with a plan to do what’s needed, and then discover that the first step is “bad” and it should keep doing what it’s doing.

              That’s the little man sitting at a desk who knows it’s all fucked. Did all the work and then was directed to ignore it, knowing that was the wrong call. Something else is in charge of that reward process (kinda), and you can’t “reason” with that process.

      • Sigh_Bafanada@lemmy.world
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        28 days ago

        Does all of this ring true for anybody else without diagnosed ADHD? Because this is exactly how I feel constantly but I also hate to self-diagnose based on internet discussion.

        I feel like ADHD is one of those things where everybody relates to it a bit, so it’s hard to know if I should look into getting a diagnosis.

        • Juice@midwest.social
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          Don’t self diagnose based on a single internet discussion but self diagnosis is crucial to getting yourself some relief. I didn’t get a diagnosis until I was about 40, and even at this point the change was dramatic. I don’t take stimulants but I take a few medications and it made life so much easier, I doubled my salary in 3 years, bought a house, just had a fantastic few years. But I also have a ton of trauma, I hurt a lot of people and myself from being so chaotic and depressed and incapable of processing thoughts or feelings, or being able to handle basic finances. I also lost like 15 years of good life where I could have been successful and happy instead of depressed and stuck in a shitty job with no clear way out.

          If you’re reading these discussions and realizing that it seems a little too familiar, take this seriously. If you decide you have it, don’t take anyone’s word that you don’t. Its hard to get treated IMO, so if you see a therapist and they don’t want to treat you for ADHD, then bye bye, find another one who will take it seriously. I went to therapists on and off for years trying to figure out why I was depressed, and they basically told me I was okay, the normal amount of unhappy with regular life stuff. I finally got on a mild antidepressant and it helped immensely. I fought and found out the antidepressant had an off label use for treating mild ADHD, and when my daughter got diagnosed I looked more into it. When I went to therapists to get treated for ADHD, they told me I was just depressed. so you gotta fight for yourself, but this world is a fuck, and it can be extremely worth while once you get what you might need.

        • ricecake@sh.itjust.works
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          28 days ago

          Yeah, a lot of brain things are like that. The way I look at it is, everyone sees a little of it, but some people see a lot of it. If you see a lot, it’s not self diagnosis to say “I have a lot of symptoms in common with people who have this, so I asked a professional”.

          You also don’t need a diagnosis to practice some of the coping strategies that people have that are non-medication. If they turn out to be helpful, that’s maybe a another reason to ask a professional.

          Self diagnosis is a bad idea, but it’s also a bad idea to ignore marked similarities you see between yourself and others. And stuff like “always put your keys and wallet in a specific basket” is only the cost of the basket.

          • flambonkscious@sh.itjust.works
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            28 days ago

            Reading this post and peoples comments got me thinking about neuroplasticity. There’s lots in life that nudges us towards neurodivergence - I’m fairly confident I’m diagnosable just from working in IT for decades. Back when I started and was more customer-facing, I was far better with people and could easily break down what’s happening for laypeople.

            Now that I’ve zoomed out and gotten far deeper technologically, I feel like I’ve adapted into the ASD / ADHD realm

        • jol@discuss.tchncs.de
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          28 days ago

          Same. I’m even a bit afraid of talking to a doctor about it because I feel like such a farse. I totally feel like I have ADHD but I’m also highly functioning. But when I think about how I’m functioning, it’s basically a series of ways I trick my brain dominoes into falling into place. At work I carefully manage all my notifications - I must avoid being distracted by them, but must put systems into place to remind me of every task.

          • Juice@midwest.social
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            28 days ago

            Read my response to this, you gotta keep fighting for yourself. I’m not against therapists bug I think there is something in their training, or maybe something to do with the business of mental health in general, that introduces all these disincentives to treatment for some people. If you take the self assessment and it seems like you have it you gotta fight like hell. I can’t even begin to describe how much better my life is and how much happier I am now that I’ve been treating it for a few years

            • jol@discuss.tchncs.de
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              28 days ago

              Is there a real assessment one can take online that isn’t basically equivalent to a buzzfeed quizz?

              • ricecake@sh.itjust.works
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                28 days ago

                No. There are tests for the types of functional behavior differences that comprise ADHD, but they can’t really be administered outside of a moderately controlled setting.

                Stuff like saying a list of words and seeing how many you can recall in a fixed time can’t really be done reliably in a quiz.

                There are tools that can say “based on what you answered, there’s a high/low probability you’d benefit from further consultation”. They’re basically “how often do you interrupt?”, “how often do you zone out?”.
                Basically a structured way of “what I’m hearing you say is …”. “Based on how you describe yourself as ADHD as hell, you might benefit from asking someone about that”.

                Self assessments can be wrong about what they suggest you ask about. If you have a concern or behaviors that you do that upset you or cause problems, then that’s worth addressing and following until you get help, but it might not be what you thought. Or the doctor might have been mistaken, since they’re also fallible, but hopefully the more objective tests can lend objectively to their conclusions.

          • prole@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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            27 days ago

            Yo, same… Add on a history of past drug abuse (several years clean), and I can’t imagine any doctor not immediately assuming I’m drug seeking and just trying to get some Adderall.

            I’m not sure if I have ADHD per-se, but I’m certainly neurodivergent and the venn diagrams of ADHD and my flavor of neurodivergence overlap quite a bit.

        • Carbonizer@lemmy.world
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          28 days ago

          I relate, but haven’t been diagnosed with ADHD. Got a doctor’s appointment tomorrow to get a referral to a psychologist for a psych evaluation, however, so I’ll let you know!

      • GTG3000@programming.dev
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        28 days ago

        Oh yeah. Wonderful memories of psyching myself up to do Thing and then suddenly getting nagged to do Thing and dropping in absolute negatives on the good old motivation.

        That’s a wonderful example at the end there, gotta remember it when I talk to people who don’t get why I was standing in doors dressed and couldn’t go outside.

      • davidagain@lemmy.world
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        27 days ago

        This, this hits so hard. Yes. Everything yes. The blanket. I don’t think anyone else in the world really understood how the blanket trapped me. Thank you for saying this.

      • prole@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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        27 days ago

        First Lemmy comment I’ve Saved. Well said.

        I’m not sure if I have ADHD, but I’m certainly neurodivergent in some way(s), and I definitely struggle with executive functioning.

        I’m literally doing it right now.

    • BeAware_@lemmy.dbzer0.comM
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      28 days ago

      For me personally, and a few others I know, it’s definitely the latter. However, everyone is different, so it’d be interesting to see other people’s replies.

      • circasurvivor@sh.itjust.works
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        28 days ago

        Agreed. Definitely the latter.

        I think this is way more of a shitty personality trait of mine than anything, but for some reason, if I’ve already gotten in the headspace to do something, and I’m preparing for it or thinking about it at that moment, etc. and someone tells me to do, I either get angry, almost like a, “I’m not an idiot you don’t have to tell me,” kind of way, or it totally deflates me and I get knocked out of that headspace for some reason.

        I don’t get what that is, but after having to wrestle with my own brain just to get simple tasks completed, having that additional stress just messes me up.

        • DrWeevilJammer@lemmy.ml
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          28 days ago

          I think the reaction depends on how aware one is of how one’s flow state works. Neurotypical people seem to be able to get back into it much easier than us ADHD types, but I think that’s often because our flow states tend to be deeper, so it’s much more annoying to be knocked out of it for seemingly trivial reasons by people who don’t know how hard it is to get back into that state after an interruption.

          In my opinion, this is (mostly) a “training issue”. If I know this is how my brain works, it’s my job to train those around me on how to help me be as efficient as possible, even if it’s something as simple as “if my headphones are on, do not interrupt me unless something is ON FIRE, OR if I have been working for more than 3 hours without a break.”

          If either of those things are true, it’s also my job to not be annoyed by the interruption, which is of course often harder than the interruption itself.

    • ThatWeirdGuy1001@lemmy.world
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      28 days ago

      Personally it all comes down to adrenaline. If a task stresses me out enough to hit me with some adrenaline I’ll complete it immediately.

      If not then I’m either doing nothing while thinking about the task or forgetting the task existed at all.

      • Great Blue Heron@lemmy.ca
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        28 days ago

        Or, the adrenaline triggers me to tell my boss I can’t do this any more, get up and walk out of a client meeting and not answer any calls from work for a few days.

    • Red_October@lemmy.world
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      28 days ago

      Kinda depends for me, super situational. The right kind of pressure and yeah I’ll do it, something like an imminent non-negotiable deadline works for me. I’m the guy who files my taxes in the last possible week, I’ll slam out a report a night or two before it’s due.

      But someone forcing me to do it? They just get flagged as an asshole who doesn’t have any authority here, even if I’ve asked them to do this, I know they’re trying to help, whatever. It’s the same situation when I try to set deadlines, or rewards, for myself. I know the guy who made those rules, he’s full of shit.

    • thepreciousboar@lemm.ee
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      28 days ago

      You can try ans give motivation, offer emotional support, sometimes even offer to do the thing together (sometimes just arranging a thing is a good way to not let it slide), but forcing will have the opposite effect and will only add to the internal pressure that is already there (but you won’t probably see) and that is not enough. Of course it depends on the person, you can also ask your friend, as long as you accept the answer as a fact with no judgement (it’s not easy but probably it will be appreciated)

    • ghen@sh.itjust.works
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      28 days ago

      If it’s someone i love and trust then it’s an absolute relief when they tell me to do it and walk me through the things. I WILL complain about it but only jokingly

    • Swedneck@discuss.tchncs.de
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      28 days ago

      personally, and i’m more on the autism side of the spectrum, i benefit from someone nudging me and ideally helping me do something, but telling me to or forcing me to do it is just abusive.

      really though, just ask the person in question what they’d prefer.

  • meseek #2982@lemmy.ca
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    28 days ago

    This meme makes a good point I’ll look into it tomorrow. I’m too busy ignoring the mountain of stuff I need to get done today to have the time

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    28 days ago

    I feel this applies to more than just adhd, for example things like burn-out and depression.

    • SchmidtGenetics@lemmy.world
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      28 days ago

      ADHD is just a bunch of symptoms in a trench coat.

      Yeah everyone pees, but if you do it 60 times a day, you should probably ask why, no?

    • bolexforsoup@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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      ADHD often comes with some degree of low-grade anxiety/depression tbh

      I remember talking to my therapist about how I’m not worried about forgetting something, I’m always worried about what I haven’t realized I have forgotten and is already causing a problem. I just live in a constant state of “something is on fire I just haven’t smelled the smoke yet.” it’s not quite PTSD, but it is certainly something analogous and it’s always this low level hum of stress. At least that’s what I took from my conversation with her.

      • aStonedSanta@lemm.ee
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        27 days ago

        Fucking hell. I have days or weeks where this happens for me but eventually passes. Usually it’s time related for me. Like I’ve missed an appointment. But there isn’t one?? 🤷‍♂️

          • Zink@programming.dev
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            27 days ago

            You know, just this week I saw the dermatologist again after several years. One of my medications makes me more susceptible to skin cancer and I needed a prescription related to a skin condition refilled.

            So I needed to go more than most. I have plenty of other simple things I’ve been waiting months to do, but it IS possible to knock these things out.

    • BougieBirdie@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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      28 days ago

      If you make a venn diagram of the symptoms of ADHD, PTSD, burnout, anxiety, bipolar, and autism you get pretty close to a circle

    • BeAware_@lemmy.dbzer0.comM
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      28 days ago

      Nothing here is a clinical diagnosis. They are just a lot of the things us with ADHD deal with on a daily basis that effects our lives enough that it severely diminishes our quality of life without physician help. See a doctor if these types of things are effecting your life in any significant way.

    • ctenidium@lemmy.world
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      28 days ago

      I have to deal with depression at the moment. I am unhappy with some circumstances in my life. Since unemployment could happen soon, it would be beneficial, if I would apply for some jobs. I even asked some friends if they knew about vacancies. But for some reason I just can’t do it. It is enormously frustrating. But reading about symptoms here and realising it actually is a symptom helps me with self compassion.

  • WanakaTree@lemm.ee
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    27 days ago

    My brother in law has ADHD. He lives next door to me.

    He has a car he parks on the street. In my city you’re required to get a registration sticker for your car, it’s like $100 or something, good for a year. Every day you don’t have a valid sticker you can get a new ticket on your car. It takes two minutes to go online and order a new one.

    For the last three years, hes been racking up tickets on his car for an expired sticker. One a week roughly, $60 per ticket I think. He usually lets them pile up until he gets final notices then pays them all online at double the cost.

    Twice now he’s has his car booted, then impounded, due to unpaid tickets. He even includes tickets on his car as part of budgeting. I’ve offered a couple times if he’d hand me his license to go online and order the sticker for him. I’ve stopped offering since that offer is met with intense anger.

    It takes TWO MINUTES to go online and order a new one. Poor guy

    • Nicoleism101@lemm.ee
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      26 days ago

      I sometimes can’t order food for my cat online for months and feed him with some local shop one when it runs out at the last minute

      Or litter same story.

      It would be cheaper, more choice, maybe healthier but I can’t force myself to sit click on site, choose one, find credit card, type it etc.

      So I always wait till last drop of cat food runs out and then full of guilt hurry outside to search for open shop. At least there is less choice in local shops.

      Choices paralyse me. I will spent hours thinking which one to choose even if it’s completely minor and especially online as IRL I simply can’t stand too long I have to grab something.

      Also one shopkeeper I think thought I was into her I think but now after a while she just looks sad and annoyed when I come instead of joyous and kind of eee weird but I have no idea to be honest it all may be just overthinking which is also a problem. I am fucking clueless and I don’t even know if I was/am interested. Probably not right I would know if I was I hope it would be obvious like idk heart pounding or whatever. Right? Right?

  • Auli@lemmy.ca
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    28 days ago

    Is this really ADHD. I might have to get tested. Everything people are posting here sounds like me.

    • snooggums@midwest.social
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      28 days ago

      ADHD is symptoms a lot of people have, but dialed up to the point that it is disruptive enough to be a disorder.

      Trouble falling asleep because your mind is racing a couple times a year, or occasionally misplace something? Probably not. If it happens a few times a week then probably…

    • callcc@lemmy.world
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      28 days ago

      I often wonder as well. Then I think: is this not just the human condition. In any case I seem to score pretty high on those online questionnaires.

      • ricecake@sh.itjust.works
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        28 days ago

        It’s a matter of scale, not a binary.

        Having a thing that you need to do but just “don’t” is perfectly common.
        Having it happen so regularly that you reliably spend a measurable part of your day wondering why you can’t just “do the thing”, or it starts to have measurable negative impacts on your job, life and relationships isn’t normal.

        Everyone feels down sometimes, but not everyone has a serotonin balance problem.
        Everyone feels difficulty focusing sometimes, but not everyone has a dopamine balance problem.

          • ricecake@sh.itjust.works
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            28 days ago

            That’s fair, situations can also cause serotonin to get suppressed without it being an inate production issue.

            This is why they recommended talk therapy in conjunction with any medication, in part so that they can reevaluate if the medication is still needed. :)

        • callcc@lemmy.world
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          27 days ago

          What of many of the things you’re “supposed to do” are things you don’t actually want to do and therefore you don’t do? What if it’s external circumstances define what’s called a mental disorder?

          Would you feel like you have a mental disorder if you lived in some completely different context?

          I’m just wondering if we can call things a disorder that might mostly arise because society is built around working better for more neurotypical people (it at all).

          Would you call it a disorder being tall if for some reason most people were short and all our infrastrucure were built for short people?

          I’m not questioning the difficulties many people have with their lives. I’m wondering what to do about it and where the threshold is.

          • ricecake@sh.itjust.works
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            27 days ago

            So, I definitely think that society has a tendency to want to “fix” behavior traits that are difficult or annoying, but I think there are also a lot that are actually problematic.
            For example, with my ADHD, I get stuck doing stuff I don’t like doing at the expense of stuff I do enjoy. Just last night after my meds wore off, I got stuck watching YouTube videos of mediocre standup comedy instead of leaning over a bit and grabbing my book that I’m extremely into and very much want to find out what happens.

            The definition I like most, which isn’t out of whack with what the standards tend towards, is something that’s:

            • a measurable or observable set of behaviors
            • causing distress to the individual
            • or causing development difficulties in children
            • or causing objective material harm to the individual or others

            If it’s causing the individual stress, or it’s clearly causing problems in their life, it’s something that should be addressed. Sometimes the easiest way to address it is just an environmental accomodation, like self directed learning, a pair of headphones, or permission to excuse yourself for a moment. I had a workplace unknowingly (to me and to them) accommodate me by putting down some anti fatigue mats where I would pace to a comical degree every day.

            A big issue in my book is that disorder is an overloaded term. Colloquially disorder means “broken”, and it doesn’t mean that clinically.
            A person with a learning disorder who can be helped by putting them in a more self directed learning environment still has a disorder that needs accomodation because they’re not performing to the standards of their peers.
            There’s also a distinction between “mental disorder” and “neurodevelopmental disorder”, with the disorder of mental disorders being the biggest one associated with the word “disorder”.

            I think it’s good that people like you ask these questions, because that’s part of what helps push society towards an understanding that many of these disorders are really just a very wide spectrum of differences from a rough average, and that our world needs to just be a little more flexible for people who do it a little different. It’s caused a lot of more modern primary education systems to be more flexible and trained in the benign accomodations that some kids need, for example. (My nephew also has ADHD and he’s having a much better experience in school than I did, of only because they were like “some kids with ADHD just have terrible handwriting, instead of endless drills, here’s your Chromebook you do all your work on now”)

            In the end, I think we need to be able to categorize things in order to be able to know how to fix up people’s environments when that’s the right answer. We also need to be aware that sometimes the environment isn’t the best fix, and that a medication can be the best way to help a person.
            For your example, I would say the individual has “crazy tall disorder” which has some easy environmental accomodations (Padded corners on cabinets), individual accomodations (teaching them proper lifting techniques and posture early since height and bad backs go hand in hand), and occasionally medical intervention (gentle back strength exercises, back and knee braces, closer monitoring of cardiac function for the truly extremely tall).

            Categorization helps us better understand how things are related, what the bounds on the spectrum are, and what accomodations can be made that help the most people, and when it’s something that needs more focused attention.
            It’s not the categorization that’s the problem, it’s the stigmatization or inflexibility that causes issues.

            • callcc@lemmy.world
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              26 days ago

              Thanks a lot for having taken time to respond so thoroughly. I must say I haven’t thought about things from this angle.

              The part about the book and the mediocre comedian definitely rings a bell. Getting stuck in stupid local extrema (like in optimization) more often than necessary is definitely a thing with me.

    • IonAddis@lemmy.world
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      28 days ago

      It can be other things. Some of why I didn’t get stuff done when younger was actually a symptom of PTSD from unrelated trauma. Basically my stress response is messed up and so anything I could link to stress or shame can make me avoidant, which snowballs into not doing the thing and more stress.

      When I unlinked daily tasks from shame and stress I could suddenly do them, as I actually have ok executive functioning when PTSD isn’t messing with me to cause avoidance which as I understand would not really be the case for ADHD. Although PTSD and the like can also pop up in ADHD people who were bullied for their symptoms.

    • BeAware_@lemmy.dbzer0.comM
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      28 days ago

      Nothing here is a clinical diagnosis. They are just a lot of the things us with ADHD deal with on a daily basis that effects our lives enough that it severely diminishes our quality of life without physician help. See a doctor if these types of things are effecting your life in any significant way.

  • Noodle07@lemmy.world
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    27 days ago

    Haha I’m so quirky, right? I also need to order a new fridge because mine broke a month ago but it’s so funny having adhd!

  • PugJesus@lemmy.world
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    26 days ago

    Reminiscing on my school days, my mother recently suggested that I might have ADHD (Inattentive).

    Really have spent the past few weeks reflecting on how figuring that out sooner could have cleared up so many things.

    • Squirrel@thelemmy.club
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      28 days ago

      Except it’s not so much “shiny” that distracts me, as it is literally anything.

      There are things that I’ve intended to do for months. Many times, I’ve been on my way to do it, only to have some little thing distract me, and then completely forget about what I intended to do. Maybe a child asks me a question. Maybe I stop to take a sip of water. Maybe I just start thinking about something else in that 10 second walk. The significance of the distraction does not matter; the task immediately vacates my mind. I often even remember that I was going to do something, but I cannot remember what.

  • shalva97@lemmy.world
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    27 days ago

    nope, it’s not easy and it’s definitely going to take 1-2 years. The worst part is that I have no guarantees it’s gonna work