• AmidFuror@fedia.io
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      27 days ago

      You’re ignoring that the law states that the Commandments are “foundational documents of our state and national government.”

      As you may be aware, it was very important to the Founders that people have no other gods and not make graven images. The U.S. Constitution specifically forbids taking the Lord’s name in vain. And of course, it is required to keep the Sabbath holy.

      No coveting, either, whether it be houses, wives, or animals. Those are right out.

          • triptrapper@lemmy.world
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            26 days ago

            A good friend of mine is a Lutheran pastor. She explained that, contrary to what I was taught in Catholic school, “taking the Lord’s name in vain” doesn’t mean swearing or saying “god damn it.” It means to bring up god or religion for your personal benefit. And, you know, of course it does. It’s amazing how religious schooling gives people permission to twist language around like that.

            • Nougat@fedia.io
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              26 days ago

              Commanding Yahweh to bring damnation in order to satisfy your personal frustration is exactly that.

        • btaf45@lemmy.world
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          26 days ago

          Would be awesome to have a t-shirt or bumper sticker with these 2 lines.

          1. Baal

          2. Yahweh

          Edit: or even better, deface every public copy of the 10 commandments by writing this on it.

    • disguy_ovahea@lemmy.world
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      26 days ago

      Separation of church and state is not technically a law. However, SCOTUS ruled against exactly this in Stone v. Graham. My fear is that states are doing this to bait it back to our newly conservative SCOTUS.

      More than 40 years ago, in Stone v. Graham, the Supreme Court overturned a similar state statute, holding that the First Amendment bars public schools from posting the Ten Commandments in classrooms. No other state requires the Ten Commandments to be displayed in public schools.

      https://www.aclu.org/press-releases/civil-liberties-groups-will-file-lawsuit-against-louisiana-law-requiring-public-schools-to-display-the-ten-commandments

      • gravitas_deficiency@sh.itjust.works
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        26 days ago

        Yeah, well, if the fascists take over and try to codify Christian theocracy into our laws, that’s a thing that I actually do think would start a civil war.

        • disguy_ovahea@lemmy.world
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          26 days ago

          The problem with civil war isn’t the justification, but the success against modern governmental warfare armaments.

          • gravitas_deficiency@sh.itjust.works
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            26 days ago

            What I’m saying is that this would incite state governments to rebel against the federal, perhaps taking (or convincing, or co-opting, or outright capturing) the military assets for their own interests.

  • bulwark@lemmy.world
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    27 days ago

    I’d be surprised if the Satanic Temple didn’t already have legislation in the works to address this.

  • kryptonianCodeMonkey@lemmy.world
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    27 days ago

    Way to invite all the trolls to display other religious iconography in your schools, Louisiana. The Satanist Creed, The Pastafarian Recipe for Enlightenment, the Festivus Rules for Stating Grievances… all is fair now.

    • KevonLooney@lemm.ee
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      27 days ago

      The real answer is to display all the other hundreds of Jewish laws in the classroom too, in the “spirit of the law”. Have a class lesson on Jewish law and its interpretation. Send the kids home asking questions about why cheeseburgers are immoral.

      • bizarroland@fedia.io
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        27 days ago

        Or how you can go to hell 4 times for cooking a bacon cheeseburger on Friday after sundown while wearing polyester pants and cotton underwear.

        • Nightwingdragon@lemmy.world
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          27 days ago

          These are the best kind of responses. The ones where I have heard so many stupid things coming from religion that I can’t tell whether or not you’re serious.

          • Billiam@lemmy.world
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            27 days ago

            I can tell you why three of them are problematic:

            1. No bacon because pork isn’t kosher.
            2. Polyester and cotton are mixed fabrics.
            3. You can’t cook an animal in the milk of it’s mother, so no cheeseburgers.

            edit: as pointed out below, cooking on the Sabbath is the fourth.

  • espentan@lemmy.world
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    27 days ago

    I applaud your time traveling prowess, Louisiana, even if you’re only capable of going backwards.

  • foggy@lemmy.world
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    27 days ago

    Unconstitutional state laws can’t be upheld just because a state goes bananas.

  • AA5B@lemmy.world
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    27 days ago

    Legislators should somehow bear the costs of the lawsuits brought about by clearly unconstitutional laws, sort of like SLAPP-back laws.

    But it is an interesting question I’d like to know more about. Does anyone know of good comparative religion sources based on core laws? People in general seem to have similar morals that I often wondered whether modern religions are all that different. Of course they have different rituals and appearances, but are the core laws any different? If other religions have something equivalent to the Ten Commandments, how much overlap is there?

  • Nightwingdragon@lemmy.world
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    27 days ago

    If I lived in Louisiana, I’d demand that this was posted right next to it. I’m not even a believer (I’m apatheist, FWIW). But The Satanic Temple just doesn’t have the shock value that it used to. Use the real thing; go for maximum shock value.

    • GiddyGap@lemm.eeOP
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      27 days ago

      They just want to force their religion of others through politics. There’s nothing worse than the mixing of politics and religion.

  • Feliskatos 🐱@lemmy.world
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    27 days ago

    How does Louisiana feel about beating the hell out of kids? I wondered so searched and results were primarily about kids being killed by beating. Not quite what I wanted, another search said Lousisana was rankied 49 in child well being. Yeah, that’s a little closer, but still not what I wanted. Per the Bible, you’re supposed to strike a kid with a rod to save their souls from sheol (which is another word for hell). Search says it’s Proverbs 23:14, though I’m not gonna look, there are several different variants. My question is, since the bible actually says to beat the hell out of kids, has Lousiana immunized parents who do so? Or is this just more religious BS? Shove the 10 commandments down kids throats but still jail parents who beat the sheol out of kids? Legal contradictions.

    Edit: Found it: Louisiana Child Abuse Laws - FindLaw

    It seems it’s illegal to beat the hell out of kids, but that’s pretty much what the bible tells parents to do. Posting the 10 commandments is some kind of police state entrapment.

    • SuperSpruce@lemmy.zip
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      27 days ago

      Or just the 10 commandments translated to the language taught in language classes. Seeing the phrases drilled down into your head for years in another language is interesting.

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    27 days ago

    Quick! Can someone PLEASE mow down a bunch of 6 Year Olds with Guns so I can PRETEND to care about the Constitution again?

    • quicklime@lemm.ee
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      27 days ago

      It’s still (moderately) difficult to find a bunch of 6 year olds with guns. But the way things are going, I’m sure that will be remedied before long.

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    27 days ago

    You know who probably lobbies for this hot, unconstitutional garbage behind closed doors? Not the religious right.

    Lawyers.

    HB71 should be called The Shithole State Louisiana Attorney Employment Act, because this is going to need a ton of lawyers.

    Lawyers to sue about its unconstitutionality.

    Lawyers to defend its constitutionality.

    Lawyers that represent Islam, Pastafarianism, Hinduism, etc. that want all aboard this state-promotion-of-religion train.

  • corsicanguppy@lemmy.ca
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    27 days ago

    THE Ten Commandments?

    Can we make new ones? Like, I’ve blown that one about shouting Jehovah in frustration, so we should just ditch it - too hard - and go with “don’t be a dick – wil Wheaton” - WITH the attribution - and maybe swap out some others too.

    My neighbor’s wife has a pretty donkey, if I’m honest, and I’m told gawking at it is verboten if it’s also his. It’s a lot of math, I think.